25 Countries You Didn’t Know Existed (and they’re amazing!)

Think you know your geography? Well, hang tight because there are a few places on this list that you might have no idea exist. Many of them are island nations, and some are way off the beaten path. If you are into diving, hiking, and exploring exotic places, you’ll want to pay close attention.

Even if that’s not you, by the end of this list, you’ll hear about at least one place you’ll want to add to your travel list.

Here are 25 countries you didn’t know existed (and they’re amazing!).

25. Tuvalu

Tuvalu is a small island nation located in the Pacific Ocean, about halfway between Hawaii and Australia. It is made up of nine coral atolls and islets, which are located on the western edge of the Polynesian Triangle. The country has a total land area of just 26 square kilometers, making it one of the smallest countries in the world.

The population of Tuvalu is around 11,000 people, most of whom live on the main island of Funafuti. The people of Tuvalu are known as Tuvaluans, and they are predominantly Polynesian. English and Tuvaluan are the official languages of the country.

The economy of Tuvalu is small and heavily reliant on foreign aid. The main industries are fishing, tourism, and the sale of stamps and coins to collectors. The country also generates income from the leasing of its internet domain name, “.tv”, to television and video production companies.

Despite its small size and limited resources, Tuvalu has a rich culture and a strong sense of community. Traditional dance and music are an important part of Tuvaluan life, and the country’s annual Independence Day celebrations are a highlight of the cultural calendar.

Tuvalu is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, as rising sea levels are a threat to the country’s low-lying atolls. The government is working to adapt to these challenges and to protect the country’s environment and natural resources.

 

24. Bhutan

Bhutan is a small landlocked country located in the eastern Himalayas, bordered by India to the south, east, and west, and by China to the north. It is a unique country in many ways, with a strong focus on preserving its cultural heritage and natural environment.

The official name of Bhutan is the Kingdom of Bhutan, and it is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary democracy. The current king of Bhutan is Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck. Bhutan is known for its policy of Gross National Happiness, which prioritizes the well-being of its citizens over economic growth.

The population of Bhutan is around 775,000, and the official language is Dzongkha. The majority of the population is Bhutanese, but there are also significant populations of Nepalese and indigenous ethnic groups. Buddhism is the dominant religion in Bhutan, and Bhutanese culture is deeply influenced by Buddhist traditions.

The economy of Bhutan is primarily agricultural, with rice, maize, and wheat being the main crops. The country is also rich in natural resources, including hydropower, timber, and minerals. Bhutan has recently started to develop its tourism industry, and the country is known for its beautiful landscapes, cultural attractions, and adventure sports.

Bhutan has made significant progress in improving the lives of its citizens in recent years, with a focus on education, healthcare, and infrastructure development. However, like many developing countries, it faces challenges such as poverty, inequality, and environmental degradation.

23. Kiribati

Kiribati is a small island nation located in the central Pacific Ocean. It is made up of 33 coral atolls and islands, which are scattered over an area of 3.5 million square kilometers. The country is located on the equator, and its capital city, South Tarawa, is one of the most densely populated places on Earth.

The population of Kiribati is around 116,000, and the majority of the people are I-Kiribati, who are of Micronesian descent. The official language of Kiribati is English, but the majority of the population also speaks Gilbertese, which is the native language. Christianity is the dominant religion in Kiribati, with the majority of the population being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of Kiribati is small and heavily reliant on foreign aid. The main industries are fishing, tourism, and the production of copra, which is used to make coconut oil. The country also generates income from the sale of fishing licenses to foreign vessels and from the leasing of its internet domain name, “.ki”, to companies.

Kiribati is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, as rising sea levels are a threat to the country’s low-lying atolls. The government is working to adapt to these challenges and to protect the country’s environment and natural resources. Kiribati is also working to improve the lives of its citizens through initiatives such as education, healthcare, and infrastructure development.

22. Palau

Palau is an island nation located in the western Pacific Ocean. It is made up of around 500 small islands, which are scattered over an area of around 500,000 square kilometers. The country is located about 2,000 kilometers east of the Philippines and is a part of the Micronesia region.

The population of Palau is around 21,000, and the majority of the people are Palauans, who are of Austronesian descent. The official languages of Palau are English and Palauan, and the country has a strong tradition of oral storytelling and cultural festivals. Christianity is the dominant religion in Palau, with the majority of the population being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of Palau is small and heavily reliant on tourism and foreign aid. The country is known for its beautiful beaches, coral reefs, and cultural attractions, and it is a popular destination for scuba diving and snorkeling. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Palau is a constitutional democracy, with a president and a bicameral parliament. The country has a strong tradition of environmental protection, and it has established a number of marine protected areas to conserve its marine resources. Palau is also a member of the United Nations and other international organizations.

21. St. Kitts & Nevis

St. Kitts and Nevis is a small Caribbean country located in the Leeward Islands. It is made up of two islands, St. Kitts and Nevis, which are located about 2,000 kilometers southeast of Florida. The country has a total land area of just 261 square kilometers, making it one of the smallest countries in the world.

The population of St. Kitts and Nevis is around 53,000, and the majority of the people are of African descent. The official language of the country is English, and the majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of St. Kitts and Nevis is primarily based on tourism, agriculture, and manufacturing. The country is known for its beautiful beaches, cultural attractions, and natural beauty, and it is a popular destination for tourists. The main crops are grown in St. Kitts and Nevis include sugarcane, vegetables, and fruits. The country is also known for its production of rum and other agricultural products.

St. Kitts and Nevis is a parliamentary democracy, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its strong commitment to regional integration and cooperation.

20. Vanuatu

Vanuatu is a small island nation located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, about 1,750 kilometers east of Australia. It is made up of 83 islands, which are scattered over an area of around 12,200 square kilometers. The country is located on the eastern edge of the Melanesian region and is known for its diverse culture and natural beauty.

The population of Vanuatu is around 309,000, and the majority of the people are Melanesian. The official language of Vanuatu is English, but there are also a number of local languages spoken in the country. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Presbyterian or Roman Catholic.

The economy of Vanuatu is primarily based on agriculture, tourism, and the export of fish and other seafood. The main crops grown in Vanuatu include copra (which is used to make coconut oil), cocoa, and vanilla. The country is also known for its production of kava, which is a traditional drink made from the roots of the kava plant.

Vanuatu is a parliamentary democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Vanuatu is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

19. Seychelles

Seychelles is an archipelago of 115 islands located in the western Indian Ocean, about 1,600 kilometers east of the African mainland. The country has a total land area of around 455 square kilometers, making it one of the smallest countries in Africa.

The population of Seychelles is around 98,000, and the majority of the people are of African descent. The official languages of Seychelles are English, French, and Seychellois Creole, and the majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic.

The economy of Seychelles is primarily based on tourism, fishing, and agriculture. The country is known for its beautiful beaches, coral reefs, and natural beauty, and it is a popular destination for tourists. The main crops grown in Seychelles include coconuts, vanilla, and spices. The country is also known for its production of tuna and other seafood.

Seychelles is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Seychelles is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

18. Comoros

 

The Comoros is an island nation located in the western Indian Ocean, about 250 kilometers northwest of Madagascar. It is made up of three main islands, Grande Comore, Anjouan, and Mohéli, and a number of smaller islands. The country has a total land area of around 2,235 square kilometers.

The population of the Comoros is around 870,000, and the majority of the people are Comorian, who are of African and Arab descent. The official languages of the Comoros are French, Arabic, and Comorian, and the majority of the population is Muslim.

The economy of the Comoros is primarily based on agriculture, fishing, and trade. The main crops grown in the Comoros include cloves, vanilla, and coconuts, and the country is also known for its production of ylang-ylang, which is used in perfumes and essential oils. The Comoros is heavily reliant on foreign aid, and the government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

The Comoros is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. The Comoros is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

17. Timor-leste

Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor, is a small island nation located in Southeast Asia, about 600 kilometers northwest of Australia. It is located on the eastern half of the island of Timor and is bordered by Indonesia to the west.

The population of Timor-Leste is around 1.3 million, and the majority of the people are Timorese, who are of Austronesian descent. The official languages of Timor-Leste are Portuguese and Tetum, and the majority of the population is Catholic.

The economy of Timor-Leste is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of oil and natural gas. The main crops grown in Timor-Leste include rice, corn, and cassava, and the country is also known for its production of coffee, sandalwood, and coconut oil. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Timor-Leste is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Timor-Leste is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

16. Lesotho

Lesotho is a small landlocked country located in southern Africa, surrounded by South Africa. It has a total land area of around 30,000 square kilometers and is home to around 2.2 million people.

The majority of the population of Lesotho is of Sotho descent, and the official language of the country is Sesotho. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of Lesotho is primarily based on agriculture, manufacturing, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Lesotho include corn, wheat, and beans, and the country is also known for its production of wool, mohair, and textiles. The government is working to diversify the economy and promote sustainable development.

Lesotho is a parliamentary democracy, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Lesotho is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

15. Suriname

Suriname is a small country located in northern South America, bordered by Brazil to the south, Guyana to the west, and French Guiana to the east. It has a total land area of around 163,000 square kilometers and is home to around 579,000 people.

The majority of the population of Suriname is of East Indian, African, and Javanese descent, and the official languages of the country are Dutch and Sranan Tongo. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Hindu, Muslim, or Protestant.

The economy of Suriname is primarily based on the extraction of natural resources, including oil, gold, and timber. The country is also known for its production of rice, bananas, and other agricultural products. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Suriname is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Suriname is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

14. Brunei darussalam

Brunei Darussalam is a small country located on the island of Borneo, in Southeast Asia. It is bordered by Malaysia to the north and east, and has a total land area of around 5,765 square kilometers.

The population of Brunei Darussalam is around 446,000, and the majority of the people are Bruneian, who are of Malay descent. The official language of the country is Malay, and the majority of the population is Muslim.

The economy of Brunei Darussalam is primarily based on the extraction and export of oil and natural gas, which account for more than 90% of the country’s GDP. The country is also known for its production of rubber and its tourism industry. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Brunei Darussalam is a constitutional monarchy, with the Sultan of Brunei serving as the head of state. The country has a parliamentary system of government, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. Brunei Darussalam is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation.

13. Andorra

Andorra is a small country located in the Pyrenees Mountains, between Spain and France. It has a total land area of around 468 square kilometers and is home to around 77,000 people.

The majority of the population of Andorra is of Catalan descent, and the official languages of the country are Catalan, Spanish, and French. The majority of the population is Catholic.

The economy of Andorra is primarily based on tourism, which accounts for around 80% of the country’s GDP. The country is known for its ski resorts, cultural attractions, and natural beauty, and it is a popular destination for tourists. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Andorra is a parliamentary democracy, with a head of government (the Prime Minister of Andorra) and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Andorra is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

12. Djibouti

Djibouti is a small country located in the Horn of Africa, bordered by Eritrea to the north, Ethiopia to the west and south, and Somalia to the southeast. It has a total land area of around 23,000 square kilometers and is home to around 947,000 people.

The majority of the population of Djibouti is of Somali, Afar, and Arab descent, and the official languages of the country are French and Arabic. The majority of the population is Muslim.

The economy of Djibouti is primarily based on the extraction and export of natural resources, including salt and gypsum, and the country is also known for its transportation and logistics industry. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Djibouti is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Djibouti is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

11. Eswatini

Eswatini, also known as Swaziland, is a small landlocked country located in southern Africa, bordered by South Africa and Mozambique. It has a total land area of around 17,364 square kilometers and is home to around 1.3 million people.

The majority of the population of Eswatini is of Swazi descent, and the official language of the country is Swati. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Zionist or Roman Catholic.

The economy of Eswatini is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Eswatini include sugarcane, cotton, and maize, and the country is also known for its production of wood and timber. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Eswatini is a constitutional monarchy, with the King of Eswatini serving as the head of state. The country has a parliamentary system of government, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. Eswatini is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation.

10. Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands is a small island nation located in the western Pacific Ocean, about 2,000 kilometers northwest of Australia. It is made up of around 992 small islands, which are scattered over an area of around 28,000 square kilometers.

The population of the Solomon Islands is around 668,000, and the majority of the people are Melanesian. The official languages of the Solomon Islands are English and Melanesian Pidgin, and the majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of the Solomon Islands is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in the Solomon Islands include cocoa, copra (which is used to make coconut oil), and cocoa, and the country is also known for its production of timber. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

The Solomon Islands is a parliamentary democracy, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. The Solomon Islands is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

09. Togo

Togo is a small West African country located between Ghana and Benin. It has a total land area of around 57,000 square kilometers and is home to around 8.2 million people.

The majority of the population of Togo is of Ewe, Mina, and Kabye descent, and the official languages of the country are French and Ewe. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of Togo is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Togo include corn, cassava, and yams, and the country is also known for its production of coffee, cocoa, and phosphate. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Togo is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Togo is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

08. New Caledonia

New Caledonia is a small island nation located in the western Pacific Ocean, about 1,500 kilometers east of Australia. It is made up of a main island, Grande Terre, and a number of smaller islands, and has a total land area of around 18,575 square kilometers.

The population of New Caledonia is around 280,000, and the majority of the people are of Kanak descent. The official languages of New Caledonia are French and Kanak, and the majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic.

The economy of New Caledonia is primarily based on the extraction and export of natural resources, including nickel, cobalt, and iron ore. The country is also known for its tourism industry and its production of agricultural products, including copra (which is used to make coconut oil), vanilla, and cocoa. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

New Caledonia is an overseas territory of France, and it has a unique legal status within the French Republic. The country has a parliamentary system of government, with a president and a unicameral parliament. New Caledonia is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation.

07. Mauritius

Mauritius is a small island nation located in the Indian Ocean, about 2,000 kilometers east of Madagascar. It has a total land area of around 2,040 square kilometers and is home to around 1.3 million people.

The majority of the population of Mauritius is of Indian, African, and Chinese descent, and the official languages of the country are English and French. The majority of the population is Hindu, but there are also significant numbers of Muslims and Christians.

The economy of Mauritius is primarily based on the services sector, including tourism, financial services, and telecommunications. The country is also known for its production of sugar, textiles, and other manufactured goods. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Mauritius is a parliamentary democracy, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Mauritius is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

06. Grenada

Grenada is a small island nation located in the Caribbean Sea, about 320 kilometers north of Venezuela. It is made up of the main island of Grenada and a number of smaller islands, and has a total land area of around 344 square kilometers.

The population of Grenada is around 112,000, and the majority of the people are of African descent. The official language of Grenada is English, and the majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of Grenada is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Grenada include nutmeg, cocoa, and bananas, and the country is also known for its production of spices and other agricultural products. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Grenada is a parliamentary democracy, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Grenada is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

05. Benin

Benin is a small West African country located between Togo and Nigeria. It has a total land area of around 112,000 square kilometers and is home to around 12.3 million people.

The majority of the population of Benin is of Fon, Adja, and Yoruba descent, and the official languages of the country are French and Fon. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic or Protestant.

The economy of Benin is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Benin include corn, cassava, and yams, and the country is also known for its production of cotton, palm oil, and rubber. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Benin is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Benin is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

04. Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso is a small landlocked country located in West Africa, bordered by Mali to the west, Niger to the east, Benin to the southeast, Togo and Ghana to the south, and Côte d’Ivoire to the southwest. It has a total land area of around 274,000 square kilometers and is home to around 20.7 million people.

The majority of the population of Burkina Faso is of Mossi, Fula, and Lobi descent, and the official language of the country is French. The majority of the population is Muslim, but there are also significant numbers of Christians.

The economy of Burkina Faso is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Burkina Faso include corn, millet, and sorghum, and the country is also known for its production of cotton and gold. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Burkina Faso is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Burkina Faso is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

03. Niue

Niue is a small island nation located in the western Pacific Ocean, about 2,400 kilometers northeast of New Zealand. It has a total land area of around 260 square kilometers and is home to around 1,600 people.

The population of Niue is primarily of Polynesian descent, and the official languages of the country are English and Niuean. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Protestant.

The economy of Niue is primarily based on the service sector, including tourism, financial services, and telecommunications. The country is also known for its production of agricultural products, including taro, yams, and coconuts. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Niue is a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand, and it has a parliamentary system of government, with a premier and a unicameral parliament. Niue is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Niue is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

02. Sao Tome and Principe

São Tomé and Príncipe is a small island nation located in the Gulf of Guinea, in the central Atlantic Ocean. It is made up of two main islands, São Tomé and Príncipe, and a number of smaller islands, and has a total land area of around 1,001 square kilometers.

The population of São Tomé and Príncipe is around 220,000, and the majority of the people are of African descent. The official language of the country is Portuguese, and the majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic.

The economy of São Tomé and Príncipe is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in the country include cocoa, coffee, and copra (which is used to make coconut oil), and the country is also known for its production of oil and natural gas. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

São Tomé and Príncipe is a presidential democracy, with a president and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. São Tomé and Príncipe is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

01. Dominica

Dominica is a small island nation located in the Caribbean Sea, about halfway between Puerto Rico and Trinidad and Tobago. It has a total land area of around 754 square kilometers and is home to around 73,000 people.

The majority of the population of Dominica is of African descent, and the official language of the country is English. The majority of the population is Christian, with the majority being Roman Catholic.

The economy of Dominica is primarily based on agriculture, forestry, and the extraction of natural resources. The main crops grown in Dominica include bananas, citrus fruits, and coconuts, and the country is also known for its production of coffee, cocoa, and spices. The government is working to diversify the economy and to promote sustainable development.

Dominica is a parliamentary democracy, with a prime minister and a unicameral parliament. The country is a member of the United Nations and other international organizations, and it is known for its commitment to regional integration and cooperation. Dominica is also a party to a number of environmental and humanitarian conventions, and it has a strong commitment to environmental protection and sustainable development.

 

 

Arif Hossain

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